I’m going to Alaska!

I’m going to be one of 3 speakers at an upcoming CLE (continuing legal eduction) session in Alaska, well actually 2 of them, as one is in Anchorage and one is in Fairbanks. Here are the details in case I have any Alaska readers…   

The Military Law Task Force

 

presents REPRESENTING SOLDIERS WHO CAN NO LONGER SERVE
 In Anchorage Lunch Hour CLE – $50.00*October 3rd 12:00 noon – 1:45 p.m.Law Offices of Fortier & Mikko101 W Benson, Suite 30412:00 – 1:00 Ethical Considerations in Representing Soldiers Who Can No Longer Serve 1:00 – 1:45 Legal Protections for Soldiers and their Families in Civil and Military CourtsOverview of Uniform Code of Military Justice The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act* Alaska Bar Approval – 1.75 CLE credits, including 1 ethics creditIn FairbanksOctober 4th Half Day CLE – $75.00*12:00 noon – 6:00 p.m.Alaska Peace Center507 Gaffney Road12:00 – 1:00 Ethical Considerations in Representing Soldiers Who Can No Longer Serve1:00 – 1:45 The Military Contract1:45 – 2:45 Administrative Discharges – Part I**BREAK**3:00 – 4:00 Administrative Discharges – Part II4:00 – 4:45 Courts Martial4:45 – 6:00 The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act* Alaska Bar Approval – 5.75 CLE credits, including 1 ethics creditTo reserve your space: Email Alison Carter, alaskagirights@yahoo.com by 5:00 p.m. October 1, 2008. Payment on the day of training by cash or check payable to Alaska Peace Center only. For more information call 907-322-8661FACULTYJames Branum is a solo-practitioner in Oklahoma City where he represents servicemembers who are seeking a discharge from the U.S. military or who need legal counsel when facing Courts Martial. Mr. Branum graduated from Oklahoma City University (OCU) of Law in 2005. He has amassed an extensive knowledge of military through an externship with the Dean’s Summer Public Interest Fellowship at OCU School of law, his prior work as a lay counselor through the Oklahoma Committee for Conscientious Objectors and the training in military law from New College of California School of Law of San Francisco in January 2005. Mr. Branum is a Steering Committee member of the Military Law Task Force of the National Lawyers Guild. Margaret Stock is an attorney in Anchorage, Alaska; a Lieutenant Colonel in the Military Police Corps, U.S. Army Reserve; and an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Sciences at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York. Ms. Stock graduated from Harvard Law School in 1992. As a freshman in college, she joined the Reserve Officer Training Corps. At the end of her sophomore year, she was commissioned in the Military Police Corps. While she completed her undergraduate education at Harvard-Radcliffe, she served in an infantry brigade in the Army Reserve. After graduation, she volunteered for a three-year active duty tour in Alaska. She was assigned to the Sixth Infantry Division (Light) in Fort Richardson, Alaska, where her duties ranged from law enforcement activities to combat training. For a brief period, she was the commander of the Fort Richardson Special Reaction Team. Ms. Stock currently practices immigration law.Peggy Herman owns and operates her own law firm in Seattle, Washington where she practices primarily family based immigration, naturalization, and removal defense. She also provides direct representation to GIs and consultation to other Military Law Task Force members on immigration matters. Ms. Herman graduated from University of Washington, Tacoma, in 1998 and from Seattle University School of Law in 2001. She was the co-chair of the law school’s NLG student chapter from 1998-2000 and became active in several NLG projects and committees including the National Immigration Project, Mass Defense Committee and Military Law Task Force. In April 2003, she was elected Vice President of Guild’s Northwest Region and has served on the National Executive Committee of the NLG for the past five years.

One thought on “I’m going to Alaska!”

  1. Congrats! i hope you have time to do a little siteseeing, like Denali Park. Anyway, on your bio here, it names “Oklahoma Committee for Conscientious Objectors” rather that the new name, Oklahoma Center for Conscience. Is that on purpose, since it’s referring to a past relationship?

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